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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais and tourists get into water fights during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran021.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: A Thai woman stands in the street after getting doused with water during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran020.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: A Thai woman throws water at a tourist while he passes a bar during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran019.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais and tourists get into water fights during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran018.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais and tourists get into water fights during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran017.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais throw water on a tourist Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran016.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais and tourists get into water fights during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran015.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais and tourists get into water fights during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran014.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thai women throw water at a tourist during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran013.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais and tourists get into water fights during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran012.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais and tourists get into water fights during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran011.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais and tourists get into water fights during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran010.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais and tourists get into water fights during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran009.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais and tourists get into water fights during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran008.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais and tourists get into water fights during Songkran festivities on a soi off of Sukhumvit Rd in Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran007.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais squirt each other with water on Songkran in central Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran006.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais squirt each other with water on Songkran in central Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran005.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais squirt each other with water on Songkran in central Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran004.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: Thais squirt each other with water on Songkran in central Bangkok Tuesday. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran003.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: A woman cleanses a Buddha statue at a temple on Songkran in central Bangkok Tuesday. The tradition of spraying people with water started with cleansing the statues. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran002.jpg
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  • Apr. 13, 2010 - Bangkok, Thailand: A boy squirts a motorcycle taxi with water during Songkran festivities in central Bangkok. Songkran is the Thai New Year's holiday, celebrated from April 13 - 15. This year's official celebrations have been cancelled because of the Red Shirt protests but Thais are still marking the holiday. It's one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. Songkran originally was celebrated only in the north of Thailand, and was adapted from the Indian Holi festival. Except the Thais throw water instead of colored powder. The throwing of water originated as a way to pay respect to people, by capturing the water after it had been poured over the Buddhas for cleansing and then using this "blessed" water to give good fortune to elders and family by gently pouring it on the shoulder. Among young people the holiday evolved to include dousing strangers with water to relieve the heat, since April is the hottest month in Thailand (temperatures can rise to over 100°F or 40°C on some days). This has further evolved into water fights and splashing water over people riding in vehicles. The water is meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and is sometimes filled with fragrant herbs when celebrated in the traditional manner. Photo by Jack Kurtz
    Songkran001.jpg
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