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Rice field salmon(13 images)

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  • Frozen juvenile salmon, left, from 40 days previous, and right, after 40 days in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_01.jpg
  • Frozen juvenile salmon, left, from 40 days previous, and right, after 40 days in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_02.jpg
  • Members of the media photograph frozen juvenile salmon, left, from 40 days previous, and right, after 40 days in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_03.jpg
  • California Marsh and Farm conservation biologist Emma Cox wades into a rice field to collect fish food on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_04.jpg
  • Frozen juvenile salmon, left, from 40 days previous, and right, after 40 days in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_05.jpg
  • Members of the media photograph frozen juvenile salmon displayed by California Trout's Jacob Katz, center, in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_06.jpg
  • Frozen juvenile salmon, bottom two, from 40 days previous, and top, after 40 days in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_07.jpg
  • California Trout's Jacob Katz, center, talks to members of the media in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_08.jpg
  • California Trout's Jacob Katz catches juvenile salmon out of a "live car" used to catch and count fish in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_09.jpg
  • California Trout's Jacob Katz catches juvenile salmon out of a "live car" used to catch and count fish in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_10.jpg
  • California Trout's Jacob Katz catches juvenile salmon out of a "live car" used to catch and count fish in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_11.jpg
  • California Trout's Jacob Katz catches juvenile salmon out of a "live car" used to catch and count fish in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_12.jpg
  • California Trout's Jacob Katz wades next to a "live car" used to catch and count fish in a rice field on Knaggs Ranch near Woodland, California, March 23, 2013. Research by UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, conservation science and advocacy organization California Trout, and the California Department of Water Resources shows that salmon raised in a floodplain have higher growth rates than those in a river or hatchery.
    salmon04_13.jpg