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A Troubled Paradise-Full Edit(195 images)

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The Maldives' Troubled Paradise
Beneath the outsiders' vision of the Maldives lurks a troubled reality- one shaped by
30 years of a brutal dictatorship. No one knows this better than Mohamed Nasheed,
the nation's new democratically elected President, who unseated Maumoon Abdul
Gayoom, the Maldives' ruler since 1978, in a landmark election in October 2008.
Nasheed...
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  • Mariyam Manike stands defiantly, while her lawyer, Abdulla Haseen, discusses her case with journalists in Malé, Maldives on March 11, 2009. Manike is the mother of  Evan Naseem, a 19 year old boy who was initially arrested for drug use and later, tortured and killed by the Maldives National Security Services (NSS) in 2003. After after openly criticizing the government's responsibility for her son's death, she too was arrested and tortured by the government of former dictator Maumoon Abdul Gayoom.
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  • Two men walk by one of the few remaining coral stone homes in Male, the capital of the Maldives on March 11, 2009.
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  • Fisherman weigh a yellowfin tuna at the fish market in Malé, Maldives on March 11, 2009. Tuna fishing and tourism are the primary motors of the Maldivian economy commanding more than 60% of GDP.
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  • A fisherman drags a yellowfin tuna at the fish market in Malé, Maldives on March 11, 2009, while another man returns with supplies for his crew. Tuna fishing and tourism are the primary motors of the Maldivian economy commanding more than 60% of GDP.
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  • Passengers sit and chat while travelling between Malé and Hulhumalé on a public ferry, called dhonies on March 11, 2009. The government of Mohamed Nasheed pledges to link all the islands of the Maldives via a ferry system.
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  • A view of the ocean and sky from the beach on Hulhumalé, Maldives on March 11, 2009.
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  • Two migrant workers from Bangladesh pose for a photo on a construction site in Hulhumalé, Maldives on March 11, 2009. Many Bangladeshi are victims of scams that bring them to the Maldives with the promise of high paying jobs. On arrival they discover an alternative reality. As undocumented workers, they are easily taken advantage of by unscrupulous business owners.
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  • A man carrying a young boy rides a motor scooter in Hulhumalé, Maldives on March 11, 2009. The political poster on the building is of former president and dictator Maumoon Abdul Gayoom who still finds popular support on the less populated islands.
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  • A view of Club Faru, a resort island near the ocean Hulhumalé, Maldives on March 11, 2009.
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  • A man talks on his cellular phone while another fetches things to load on the boat on Hulhumalé, Maldives on March 11, 2009. Hulhumalé is an almost entirely man made island using dug up sand and coral.
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  • Boats sit at anchor in the harbor of Hulhumalé, Maldives on March 11, 2009. Club Faru Resort, also known as Farukolhufushi island, sits in the distance.
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  • Construction workers move along the wide streets and apartment blocks in Hulhumalé, Maldives on March 11, 2009. Hulumalé, an entirely man-made island that was started by filling in the reef in 1993 may be one of the solutions the Maldives has to combat the effects of climate change as it is 2 meters (6 feet) above sea level. It is estimated that the island will accommodate up to 150,000 people upon completion.
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  • Construction workers tie steel rods that will reinforce the cement pilars of an apartment builing in Hulhumalé, Maldives on March 11, 2009. Hulumalé is safety net in the Brave New World for many Maldivians as it is an entirely man-made island that is 2 meters (6 feet) above sea level. Most of the islands that make up the island nation of the Maldives are less than one meter (three feet) above sea level.
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  • Two mothers accompany their children home from school on March 11, 2009 in Hulhumalé, Madives. Hulhumalé, which means "the new Malé", is a distinct contrast to the crowded and chaotic streets of Malé. With it's wide streets and apartment block buildings, the island is expected to house up to 150, 000 people. At two meters (6 feet) above sea level it may be the only future of the Maldives.
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  • A boat, also known as a dhoni, pulls in to the harbor of Malé, Maldives on March 11, 2009.
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  • A young man aboard a ferry looks off at the capital of the Maldives, Malé on March 11, 2009.
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  • A mother poses with her children, while two women wearing hijabs take picture with a cell phone  along the sea wall that protects Male, the capital of the Maldives on March 11, 2009. The seawall is reinforced by concrete tetrapods, which were donated to Male by the Japanese Government.
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  • A muslim man and a woman in a niqab ride along Marine Drive in Malé, Maldives on March 11, 2009. During the reign of ex-president and dictator Maumoon Abdul Gayoon, the wearing of veils was forbidden. The newly elected government of Mohamed Nasheed position is that the solution to Islamic Fundamentalism is education and democracy, but there is rising concern of growing fundamentalism.
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  • A group of motorcyclists stroll along Marine Drive on March 11, 2009 in Malé, Maldives. Joy-riding is a favorite way to pass the time in Malé. Once the sun lowers in the late afternoon, people ride around the island to socialize, see friends and be seen. Motorcycles are a sign of status, an oddity on an island that extends just 1.5 square kilometers (1 square mile).
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  • A group of boys play bai bala, a traditional Maldivian game where one team attempts to tag members of the other team inside a sand circle, on March 11, 2009 in Malé, Maldives.
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  • A group of boys play bai bala, a traditional Maldivian game where one team attempts to tag members of the other team inside a sand circle, on March 11, 2009 in Malé, Maldives.
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  • A group of boys play bai bala, a traditional Maldivian game where one team attempts to tag members of the other team inside a sand circle, on March 11, 2009 in Malé, Maldives.
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  • A group of boys play bai bala, a traditional Maldivian game where one team attempts to tag members of the other team inside a sand circle, on March 11, 2009 in Malé, Maldives.
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  • Children play, swim and jump off the stairs that lead in to New Harbor in Malé Maldives on March 11, 2009. The harbor was created when the Japanese government paid $60 million to fund the construction of the cement tetrapod sea wall that outlines the harbor.
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  • Children play, swim and jump off the stairs that lead in to New Harbor in Malé Maldives on March 11, 2009. The harbor was created when the Japanese government paid $60 million to fund the construction of the cement tetrapod sea wall that outlines the harbor.
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