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Archive: Prairie Dog Wars(59 images)

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Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas. The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch. The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and...
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  • Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Corn outside Colby, Kansas...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Billboard off the Interstate in Colby, Kansas...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • License Plate.  Colby, Kansas.  Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Boot on a fencepost near Russell Springs, KS...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Dead rattlesnake on the road near Russell Springs, Kansas...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Dr. Bob McElroy of the Topeka Audubon on the Haverfield Ranch....Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Prairie dog skull near the Haverfield home...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Truck behind the Haverfield home...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Dead calf behind the Haverfield home.  The HAverfields raise "risk" calves, defined by having made it through the first several months of life without the usual vaccinations.  The Haverfields lose more than 5% of this stock...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Truck behind the Haverfield home...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry Haverfield driving the cake truck to feed his cows.  The device on the back of the truck drops cake pellets of protein and grain for the cows, supplementing their grass diet...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry Haverfield driving the cake truck to feed his cows.  The device on the back of the truck drops cake pellets of protein and grain for the cows, supplementing their grass diet...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry Haverfield driving the cake truck to feed his cows.  The device on the back of the truck drops cake pellets of protein and grain for the cows, supplementing their grass diet...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry Haverfield driving the cake truck to feed his cows.  The device on the back of the truck drops cake pellets of protein and grain for the cows, supplementing their grass diet...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry Haverfield driving the cake truck to feed his cows.  The device on the back of the truck drops cake pellets of protein and grain for the cows, supplementing their grass diet...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry Haverfield driving the cake truck to feed his cows.  The device on the back of the truck drops cake pellets of protein and grain for the cows, supplementing their grass diet...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry Haverfield driving the cake truck to feed his cows.  The device on the back of the truck drops cake pellets of protein and grain for the cows, supplementing their grass diet...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry Haverfield driving the cake truck to feed his cows.  The device on the back of the truck drops cake pellets of protein and grain for the cows, supplementing their grass diet...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Abandoned building near the Haverfield ranch...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG


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