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Archive: Prairie Dog Wars(59 images)

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Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas. The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch. The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and...
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  • Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • University faculty and students, Fish & Wildlife employees, and volunteers prepare to locate and capture black footed ferret on the Haverfield ranch.  The animals, once captured, will be vaccinated, tagged, and rereleased.  Ferrets, a nocturnal species, are active at night when they hunt sleeping prairie dogs in their tunnels...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • University faculty and students, Fish & Wildlife employees, and volunteers prepare to locate and capture black footed ferret on the Haverfield ranch.  The animals, once captured, will be vaccinated, tagged, and rereleased.  Ferrets, a nocturnal species, are active at night when they hunt sleeping prairie dogs in their tunnels...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • University faculty and students, Fish & Wildlife employees, and volunteers prepare to locate and capture black footed ferret on the Haverfield ranch.  The animals, once captured, will be vaccinated, tagged, and rereleased.  Ferrets, a nocturnal species, are active at night when they hunt sleeping prairie dogs in their tunnels...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Still life from the Logan House, a bed and breakfast style home in Russell Springs...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Still life from the Logan House, a bed and breakfast style home in Russell Springs...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • A sign advertises Prairie Dog Town, a tourist stop off the interstate north of the Haverfield Ranch.  The "town" features a colony of docile prairie dogs, other caged animals, and "the world's largest prairie dog" --a 20 foot tall cement statue of a prairie dog.  Stuffed animals in the form of the animals are also available for purchase.  The "town" sits near the county seat, the hub of activity that is trying to erradicate prairie dogs from the area...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • A prairie dog in Prairie Dog Town, a tourist stop off the interstate north of the Haverfield Ranch.  The "town" features a colony of docile prairie dogs, other caged animals, and "the world's largest prairie dog" --a 20 foot tall cement statue of a prairie dog.  Stuffed animals in the form of the animals are also available for purchase.  The "town" sits near the county seat, the hub of activity that is trying to erradicate prairie dogs from the area...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS0...JPG
  • Statues of "the world's lagest prairie dogs"  in  Prairie Dog Town, a tourist stop off the interstate north of the Haverfield Ranch.  The "town" features a colony of docile prairie dogs, other caged animals, and "the world's largest prairie dog" --a 20 foot tall cement statue of a prairie dog.  Stuffed animals in the form of the animals are also available for purchase.  The "town" sits near the county seat, the hub of activity that is trying to erradicate prairie dogs from the area...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Audubon biologist Ron Klataske at the Logan House in Russell Springs, Kansas...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Audubon biologist Ron Klataske at the Logan House in Russell Springs, Kansas...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Audubon biologist Ron Klataske at the Logan House in Russell Springs, Kansas...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Audubon biologist Ron Klataske at the Logan House in Russell Springs, Kansas...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Rancher Gene Bertrand poses for a portrait in his home near Winona, Kansas.  Bertrand, a conservation-minded rancher, was originally in favor of releasing ferrets and keeping existing prairie dog populations on his property until pressure from the county and neighbors made him consider otherwise.  Bertrand's ranch and farm-land is now mostly operated by his son...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Rancher Gene Bertrand poses for a portrait in his home near Winona, Kansas.  Bertrand, a conservation-minded rancher, was originally in favor of releasing ferrets and keeping existing prairie dog populations on his property until pressure from the county and neighbors made him consider otherwise.  Bertrand's ranch and farm-land is now mostly operated by his son...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Storm front near Winona, Kansas.  ..Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Storm front over rancher Gene Bertrand's feed lot near Winona, Kansas.  ..Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Rural Church.  Russell Springs, Kansas...Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Larry and Bette Haverfield on their ranch near the defunct town of Russell Springs, Kansas.  The Haverfields have been embroiled in a long-running war over the presence of prairie dogs on their ranch.  The Haverfields assert, correctly, that the prairie dogs contribute to increased biodiversity on their property, enabling them to graze their cattle in a fashion that mimics the movement and grazing patterns of pre-settlement buffalo through their range.  The county, particularly county commissioner Carl Ulrich, contend that prairie dogs are a nuisance and should be eradicated.  Many of the haverfields' neighbors feel the same way.  In recent years, the county has exterminated prairie dogs from the Haverfield property using a number of methods, including gas and poison, before sending the Haverfields the bill.  The Haverfields have discovered a number of 'secondary kill' animals, carcasses of birds and mammals that have eaten the poisoned prairie dogs and subsequently been killed themselves.  Complicating matters, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has recently re-introduced endangered black footed ferrets onto the land, a natural predator of the prairie dogs.  This move has heightened tensions between neighbors and led to a series of legal maneuvers on both sides to control the spread of the prairie dogs as well as the ferrets.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Sam Wisely works to vaccinate and tag captured ferrets on the Haverfield ranch.  The ferrets are captured at night by University faculty and students, Fish & Wildlife employees, and volunteers .   Ferrets, a nocturnal species, are active at night when they hunt sleeping prairie dogs in their tunnels.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Sam Wisely works to vaccinate and tag captured ferrets on the Haverfield ranch.  The ferrets are captured at night by University faculty and students, Fish & Wildlife employees, and volunteers .   Ferrets, a nocturnal species, are active at night when they hunt sleeping prairie dogs in their tunnels.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG
  • Sam Wisely works to vaccinate and tag captured ferrets on the Haverfield ranch.  The ferrets are captured at night by University faculty and students, Fish & Wildlife employees, and volunteers .   Ferrets, a nocturnal species, are active at night when they hunt sleeping prairie dogs in their tunnels.
    Audubon_KS1...JPG


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