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Cuba(30 images)

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  • At a fishing dock, customers watch as eight marlins are harvested. Fisheries in Cuba are at dangerous levels, with some United Nations reports putting 85-percent of them at a critical stage.
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  • Fish, a staple of Cuban industry has also become a game of cat and mouse with the government, with fishermen giving some of their catch to state run stores, but sneaking hidden fish off their boat to make money for themselves.
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  • More than half of the Cuban population is Catholic, and while Castro restricted religion shortly after he seized power in 1959, the government has since backed off and generally allow the freedom to practice religions that obey the laws of the country.
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  • Members of the group Onda Expansiva, wait outside of their producers home in Alamar, Cuba. Reggaeton, a style of music with Caribbean roots, has become wildly popular in Cuba. But the Cuban government has cracked down on Reggaeton artists, saying the lyrics are too vulgar and offensive.
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  • Much like in the United States, music artists in Cuba write and record music in their homes. Reggaeton, a style of music with Caribbean roots, has become wildly popular in Cuba. But the Cuban government has cracked down on Reggaeton artists, saying the lyrics are too vulgar and offensive.
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  • The Reggaeton scene in cuba comes with it's own style, a mixture of European and Miami fashion.
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  • Inside a small room in an apartment in Alamar, Jorge Silva Corzo of the group Onda Expansiva, records his lyrics to the groups new song, Siga La Tradicion - Follow the Tradition. Since the government crackdown on reggaeton, groups like Onda Expansiva have changed their music to feel more salsa-like.
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  • In a nearly empty apartment in Regla, a neighborhood of Havana, Juli Roby el Emperador, right, is joined by his entourage and friends to start creating new music for an upcoming US tour.
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  • Juli Roby el Emperador, a popular reggaeton artist living in Cuba, is one of several young musicians who are gaining attention from outside the confines of the socialist country.
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  • Cuba's recent past with sugar production has been weak, but in the last year, the country has seen a resurgence in the cash crop along with the government allowing some private sugar cane farms.
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  • Sugar cane production in Cuba is on the upswing after several years barely surviving as a nationalized crop. Private farms, just like private businesses all over Cuba are credited with helping revive the economy.
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  • Farmworkers take a break from harvesting sugar cane on a private farm in Caimito, Cuba. The group, who work almost every day, only gets paid when there's a sale of sugar cane, so sometimes they can go weeks of work without being paid.
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  • Farmworkers pick up harvested sugar cane on a private farm in Caimito, Cuba. The group, who work almost every day, only gets paid when there's a sale of sugar cane, so sometimes they can go weeks of work without being paid.
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  • Despite being a private farm, sugar can harvesters still make a meager living. In the new Cuban economy, the owner of the farm sees a more dramatic increase in wealth, while the workers only get paid when sugar cane is sold.
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  • Yulien Diaz Hernandez, right, a farmworker for a private sugar cane farm, is greeted by his son Leyson Ardiel, 5, after Yulien returns home at midday from harvesting the cash crop. Despite sugar cane being on the rise again, workers are paid infrequently, continuing to leave them living in poverty.
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  • After showering, Yulien Diaz Hernandez, is joined by his daughter Lerian, 1, on the front step of his one room home in Caimito, Cuba. "It's not much, but it's mine," said Hernandez.
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  • Yulien Diaz Hernandez, right, a farmworker for a private sugar cane farm, sweats in the midday while preparing lunch for his family.
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  • Yulien Diaz Hernandez, right, a farmworker for a private sugar cane farm, said there is a certain hopelessness to knowing the only job for him is do is work in the sugar cane fields. In rural Cuba there are very few jobs and even less access to proper medical care.
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  • After spending the morning harvesting sugar cane, Yulien Diaz Hernandez tries to get his old television to work to show cartoons to his son and daughter. Diaz Hernandez said sugar cane workers are the first link in the chain of production, but the last to get paid.
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  • Yulien Diaz Hernandez, right, a farmworker for a private sugar cane farm, asks to borrow some cooking supplies from his neighbor, who is also his cousin. Water to his home only arrives for an hour once every 12 to 14 days. So to store the water, Diaz Hernandez made two large storage containers next to his home.
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  • Black beans, a staple food of Cuba, is one of the rations that every Cuban receives from the government.
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  • While many in Cuba live in poverty, there is a class of wealthy Cubans who have found success in owning private restaurants. This one, in Havana, is located on the 11th floor of an apartment complex and doubles as living quarters for the two men who own it.
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  • The skyline of Havana seen from a private restaurant in the middle of the city.
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  • May Day celebrations in Cuba begin before dawn, but by 9 a.m. are complete. The festivities used to last into the afternoon when Fidel Castro was in charge. Now, private enterprises, once treated of as the enemy of the economy, join in the procession past revolutionary square, to advertise their business.
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