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Kansas Water(54 images)

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  • Mitchell Baalman inspects the pump for a center pivot irrigation system on his 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (not pictured) are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_02.JPG
  • A pump for a center pivot irrigation system sits on Mitchell Baalman's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_03.JPG
  • A center pivot irrigation system waters a freshly planted wheat field on Mitchell Baalman's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_01.JPG
  • Dry corn sits in a field on Mitchell Baalman's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_05.JPG
  • Freshly planted wheat awaits watering from a center pivot irrigation system on Mitchell Baalman's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_04.JPG
  • Mitchell Baalman tends to business on the phone while making the rounds on his 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_06.JPG
  • Farm workers on Mitchell Baalman's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., harvest milo on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_09.JPG
  • Round bales of hay sit across from Mitchell Baalman's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_08.JPG
  • A center pivot irrigation system waters an alfalfa field on Mitchell Baalman's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_07.JPG
  • Farm workers on Mitchell Baalman's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., harvest milo on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_11.JPG
  • Mitchell Baalman, right, and his sister, Keyna Baalman, prepare to transport the milo harvest on the family's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_12.JPG
  • Mitchell Baalman, left, and his sister, Keyna Baalman, supervise milo harvesting on the family's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_10.JPG
  • Keyna Baalman covers a truckload of harvested milo for transport on the family's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_13.JPG
  • A field of sunflowers sits on Mitchell Baalman's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_15.JPG
  • Keyna Baalman covers a truckload of harvested milo for transport on the family's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_14.JPG
  • Mitchell Baalman stands for a portrait in a field of sunflowers on his family's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_16.JPG
  • Mitchel Baalman picks sunflower seeds on his family's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_17.JPG
  • Mitchell Baalman plants wheat on his family's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_20.JPG
  • Mitchell Baalman inspects his farming equipment as he prepares to plant wheat on his family's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_18.JPG
  • A family photograph hangs in Mitchell Baalman's office on his family's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_19.JPG
  • Mitchell Baalman prepares to plant wheat on his family's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_21.JPG
  • A center pivot irrigation system waters a field of wheat on Mitchell Baalman's 12,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman and Brett Oelke (both not pictured), are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_22.JPG
  • Brett Oelke drives to inspect a center pivot irrigation system on his family's 6,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Friday, Oct. 12, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman (not pictured) and Brett Oelke are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_23.JPG
  • Brett Oelke inspects the pump for a center pivot irrigation system on his family's 6,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Friday, Oct. 12, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman (not pictured) and Brett Oelke are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_24.JPG
  • Brett Oelke inspects the pump for a center pivot irrigation system on his family's 6,000-acre farm outside of Hoxie, Kan., on Friday, Oct. 12, 2012. As historically dry conditions continue, farmers from South Dakota to the Texas panhandle rely on the Ogallala Aquifer, the largest underground aquifer in the United States, to irrigate crops. After decades of use, the falling water level ? accelerated by historic drought conditions over the last two years ? is putting pressure on farmers to ease usage or risk becoming the last generation to grow crops on the land. Farmers like Mitchell Baalman (not pictured) and Brett Oelke are part of a farming community in in Sheridan County, Kansas, an agricultural hub in western Kansas, who have agreed to cut back on water use for crop irrigation so that their children and future generations can continue to farm and sustain themselves on the High Plains.
    KANWATER_25.JPG


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