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CROP | MOTHER JONES | HIGH RES(78 images)

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  • David Brandt emerges from his corn field with his dog, Yankee, and a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt emerges from his corn field with his dog, Yankee, and a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt emerges from his corn field with his dog, Yankee, and a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt emerges from his corn field with a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt emerges from his corn field with a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt emerges from his corn field with a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt heads in to his corn field to dig up a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt heads in to his corn field to dig up a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt heads in to his corn field to dig up a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt heads in to his corn field to dig up a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt heads in to his corn field to dig up a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt stands in his corn field with a soil sample on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt's farm is reflected in the scale in the equipment garage on Brandt's 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • A scale sits in the equipment garage of David Brandt's 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt returns to his equipment garage with his dog, Yankee, on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt returns to his equipment garage with his dog, Yankee, on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt, center, and Josh Woltz, left, work on an 1924 Fairbanks Morris antique motor in the garage of Brandt's 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • An assortment of bagged cover crop seeds sit stacked on pallets in David Brandt's equipment garage on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • An assortment of bagged cover crop seeds sit stacked on pallets in David Brandt's equipment garage on his 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt's dog, Yankee, makes his rounds on the Brandt family's 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • David Brandt's dog, Yankee, makes his rounds on the Brandt family's 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • Corn basks in the mid-morning sun on David Brandt's 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • Corn basks in the mid-morning sun on David Brandt's 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • Corn basks in the mid-morning sun on David Brandt's 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG
  • Corn basks in the mid-morning sun on David Brandt's 1,200-acre farm in central Ohio. Brandt grows corn, soy, wheat and hay on his farm that he runs with his wife, Kendra, in Carroll, Ohio. He has been practicing no-till farming since 1971, and has planted cover crops, such as winter peas, cabbage, clover and millet, which return nutrients to the soil, since 1978. His return to these traditional farming practices have allowed Brandt to drastically reduce his usage of fertilizers and pesticides, has increased the soil fertility and strengthened the land's tolerance to drought and excessive rain.
    CROP_SPINSK...JPG


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